Full profile of Dr. Md. Shoaibur Rahman

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Dr. Md. Shoaibur Rahman

Professor

Department of Agroforestry And Environment (AGF)

Faculty of Agriculture

Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science & Technology University, Dinajpur.

E-mail: shoaib_for@yahoo.com


CAREER OBJECTIVE

    To become a good teacher

RESEARCH INTEREST

    Silviculture of Forest trees

EDUCATION

  1. PhD in Forest Siliviculture and Natural Environment, 2014

    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

  2. Master of Science in Forestry, 1998

    University of Chittagong (CU)

  3. Bachelor of Science in Forestry, 1997

    University of Chittagong (CU)

  4. Higher Secondary Certificate, 1993

    Rajshahi Board

  5. Secondary School Certificate, 1991

    Rajshahi Board


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES

  1. Professor
    Dept. of Agroforestry and Environment, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University

    May 15, 2017 to Present

  2. Associate Professor
    Dept. of Agroforestry and Environment, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University

    May 16, 2013 to May 14, 2017

  3. Assistant Professor
    Dept. of Agroforestry and Environment, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University

    January 16, 2008 to May 15, 2013

  4. Lecturer
    Dept. of Agroforestry and Environment, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University

    May 15, 2005 to January 15, 2008

  5. Lecturer
    Department of Forestry, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet, Bangladesh

    March 07, 2005 to May 14, 2005


PUBLICATIONS

Journal Papers

  1. M.H.A. Amin, J.P. Roy, M.S. Rahman And M. Kajal. 2017.Economic performance of onion under Albizia lebbeck, Melia azedarach and Leucaena leucocephala based agroforestry systems. J. Innov. Dev. Strategy, 11(1): 1-8

  2. Z.A. Zeni, M.S. Rahman, M. M. Ali and M. H. A. Amin. 2015. Performance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. BARI Gom-25) under mango-based agroforestry system. Journal of Science and Technology, 13: 21-25

  3. M.S. Rahman, Fatematuzzora and A. Raihan. 2016. Growth and quality of pineapple at different orientations and distances under litchi based agroforestry system, Journal of Agroforestry and Environment, 10 (1): 17-20

  4. Z. A. Zeni, M.S. Rahman, M.R. Islam, M.M. Ali and K.C. Podder. 2015. Influence of mango-based agroforestry system and spacing on the growth and yield performance of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. var. BARI Gom 26). J. Innov. Dev. Strategy 9(1): 1-4.

  5. M. M. Rahman, M. S. Bari, M. S. Rahman, M. A. Ginnah and M. H. Rahman 2016. Screening of Potato Varieties under Litchi Based Agroforestry System. American Journal of Experimental Agriculture 14(1): 1-10

  6. Shamsuzzaman, M., Rahman, M. S. and Raihan, A. 2016. Effect of phosphorus and potassium on the growth of ghora neem (Melia azedarach l.) seedlings at the nursery stage, J. Innov. Dev. Strategy 10(2):13-16

  7. M.S. Ali, M.M.U. Miah, M.H.A. Amin, M. S. Rahman and M.A. Hanif. 2010. Varietal performance of cane in association with different multipurpose tree species. Journal of Agroforestry and Environment, 4 (2):45-47

  8. M.N. Uddin, M.M.U. Miah, M.S. Rahman, M.H.A. Amin and M.S. Rahman. 2010. Performance of Indian spinach in litchi based agroforestry. Journal of Agroforestry and Environment, 4 (1):97-100

  9. M.H.A. Amin, M.S. Rahman, P. Lakra, S.M. Rayhan and M.A. Hanif. 2010. Performance of Cabbage under multipurpose tree species as agroforestry system. Bangladesh Research Publications Journal, 4(1):76-81.

  10. Miah,MM.U., M.S.Rahman, M.A.Hakim, M.H.A.Amin and M.Z.Rahman.2008. Organic production of eggplant in multistoried agroforestry system. Journal of Agroforestry and Environment, 1 (2):45-49.

  11. Uddin, M.S., R.Ahmed, M.F.K. Khan, M.A.S.A.Khan and M.S. Rahman. 2007. Traditional farming system of Garo tribe in Netrokna district of Bangladesh. Journal of Agroforestry and Environment,1 (1):45-49

  12. Rahman, M. S. and M.A.U Mridha. 2003. Status of ectomycorrhizal association in Pinus caribaea grown in Chittagong University Campus. Journal of Forestry and Environment, 2(1):67-70

  13. Rahman, M. S. and M. A.U. Mridha. 2003. Vertical distribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the roots and rhizosphere soils of teak (Tectona grandis L.). Journal of Forestry and Environment, 2(1):27-32

  14. Rahman, M. S., M. A.U. Mridha, S. M. N. Islam, S. M. S. Haque, P. P. Dhar and S.K. Shah. 2003. Status of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in certain tropical forest tree legume seedlings. The Indian Forester, 129 (3): 371-376.

  15. Rahman, M. S., Khan, B. M., Mridha, M. A. U. and Hossain, M. K. 2000. Status of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization in Teak (Tectona grandis L.) Seedlings Grown from Pre-sowing Treated Seeds. Chittagong University Journal of Science, 24(2): 30-38

  16. Rahman, M. S., Khan, B. M., Mridha, M. A. U., Hossain, M. K. and Dhar, P. P. 2000. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization in Ghora neem (Melia azedarach L.) seedlings grown from pre-sowing treated seeds. Bangladesh Journal of Forest Science, 29(1): 9-14

Conference Papers

  1. Rahman M.S., Tsitsoni T., Tsakaldimi M., Ganatsas P. (2015). Field performance of Fraxinus ornus bareroot plants to drought stress. In: Ivetid V., Stankovid D. (eds.) Proceedings: International conference Reforestation Challenges. 03-06 June 2015, Belgrade, Serbia. Reforesta. pp. 164-174.

  2. Rahman, M.S., Tsitsoni, T. and Tsakaldimi, M. 2013. A comparison of root architecture and shoot morphology of Cercis siliquastrum L. between two water regimes. 16th Panhellenic Forestry Conference, Thessaloniki, Greece, held in 6-9 October 2013. Pp. 405-414

  3. Mridha, M.A.U. and M. S. Rahman. 2001.Mycorrhizal status of some agroforestry trees in Bangladesh. Development of Agroforestry Research in Bangladesh. Pp: 153-158

Books

  1. Rahman, M. S., M. A.U. Mridha, S. M. S. Huda, M. M. Haque and S. M. S. Haque. 2004. Effect of Fertilizers on Nodulation and Growth of Samanea saman Merr. in presence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi at Nursery Level. Book Name: “Symbiotic N-fixation- prospects for enhanced application in tropical agriculture.” Published From India. pp: 327-333


SCHOLARSHIPS

  1. Doctoral Scholarship

    Funded by: State Scholarship Foundation (IKY), Greece


PROJECTS

  1. Allelopathic effect of agroforestry trees on the germination and growth of some selected crops

    Funded by: Institute of Research and Training, HSTU (UGC Funded), 2016-2017

    Position: Principal Investigator

    Description: ABSTRACT: A study was conducted at the Research Field of Agroforestry and Environment Department, Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Bangladesh during the period of November 2016 to March 2017 to find out the allelopathic effect of four tree species on the germination, root architecture, shoot growth and yield of two wheat varieties (BARI Gom-27 and BARI Gom-28). There were five treatments including control viz. T1 (Ghora neem tree leaf), T2 (Ipil- ipil tree leaf), T3 (Mango tree leaf), T4 (Sada koroi tree leaf) and T5 (only water; Control). There were two experiments; Experiment-1 was done in laboratory condition to test the allelopathic effect of four tree species on the germination of tested wheat varieties in Petridis and Experiment-2 was done in field condition to find out the allelopathic effect of trees on the germination, growth root architecture and yield. The concentration used in the laboratory experiment for each dry leaf powder was 5%. In case of field experiment 20g dry leaf powder were mixed in each experimental plot of size 1.5ft × 1.5ft. In case of laboratory experiment, germination percentage of BARI Gom-27 was highest (95%) in Control condition followed by Sada koroi leaf extract (60%), Mango leaf extract (40%), Ipil-ipil leaf extract (45%) and lowest percentage (20%) was found in Ghora neem leaf extract. In the same way, in case of BARI Gom- 28, the highest germination percentage (90%) was recorded in Control treatment, followed by Sada koroi leaf extract (39%), Ipil ipil leaf extract (33%), Mango leaf extract (30%) and lowest (21%) was recorded in Ghora neem leaf extract. Again in field experiment, BARI Gom-27 gave the highest (88.16%) germination in Control treatment followed by Ipil-ipil tree leaf extract (84.1%), Mango tree leaf extract (82.36%), Sada koroi leaf extract (78.88%) and lowest germination percentage (77%) was found in Ghora neem leaf extract. Likewise, germination percentage of BARI Ghom-28 was found highest (85.26%) in Control and lowest (73.66%) was found in Sada koroi leaf extract. In BARI Gom-27, the highest yield (2047.61kg/ha) was observed in Control followed by Sada koroi leaf extract (1666.67 kg/ha), Ipil-ipil leaf extract (1380.09 kg/ha), Mango leaf extract (1238.09 kg/ha) and lowest (1000 kg/ha) was in Ghora neem leaf extract. In the same way in case of BARI Gom-28 the highest (1857.14 kg/ha) yield was recorded in Control followed by Sada koroi leaf extract (1523.81 kg/ha), Ipil-ipil leaf extract (1285.71kg/ha), Mango leaf extract (1190.47 kg/ha) and lowest (1095.23 kg/ha) was in Ghora neem leaf extract. Finally it can be concluded that among the two wheat varieties, BARI Gom-27 gave good result in respect to the allelopathic of the tested four tree species. Among the four tested tree species, Sada koroi leaf extract was less allelopathic effect on wheat. So, BARI Gom-27 can be cultivated with Sada koroi tree.

  2. Effect of crop residues on the germination, root architecture and shoot growth of Ghora neem (Melia azedarach L.)

    Funded by: Institute of Research and Training, HSTU (UGC Funded), 2015-2016

    Position: Principal Investigator

    Description: ABSTRACT Aims: In an agroforestry system, interactions between trees and crops are common phenomena. Ghora neem (Melia azedarach L) is assumed to be a promising tree for agroforestry practice but little is known about its interactions with associated annual crops. Therefore, the present study is undertaken to find out the different crop-residues on the germination and root -shoot development of Ghora neem seedling. Study Design: The complete randomized design was followed with five replications in each treatment. There were five treatments including control viz. Pineapple leaf extract, Napier grass extract, Wheat straw extract, Maize straw extract and only water (Control). Place and duration of the study: The study was conducted during the period of February to August 2016 at the Research Field of the Department of Agroforestry and Environment of HSTU. Methodology: Crop residues were blended with water to make 1% (w/v) solution. Germination speed was calculated as (N1*1) + (N2–N1)*1/2 + … + (Nn - Nn-1) *1/n. The inhibitory / stimulatory effects of extracts on test crops were calculated in percentage of control. Quality index was calculated as: QI=total dry weight (g)/ [height (cm)/diameter (mm) +shoot dry weight (g)/root dry weight (g)]. Growth and biomass data were measured following standard methods. Results: Germination was positively affected by different crop residues. Ghora neem seeds showed better germination in all the treatments of crop extracts compared to control. Among the root and shoot morphological traits, only number of leaves and root length varied due to crop residues. Other parameters were statistically similar. The highest number of leaves was recorded in napier grass and maize extracts and lowest in wheat straw extracts. Dry biomass did not vary significantly among the different crop residues. Root architectural analyses show that although length of first order lateral roots (FOLR) was recorded higher after 1 month than that of 2 months but their diameter and number increased over time. It can be concluded that Ghora neem tree can be a good component of agroforestry with the tested crops due to the least effect of the crop residue extracts on the shoot and root growth of Ghora neem.

  3. Influence of water stress on the root architecture and seedling morphology of neem seedlings

    Funded by: Institute of Research and Training, HSTU (UGC Funded)

    Position: Principal Investigator

    Description: ABSTRACT: An experiment was conducted from March to October 2015 to find out the responses of shoot morphology and root architecture of Azadirachta indica (neem) seedlings to water stress at the agroforestry and environment research field of HSTU. There were four treatments; namely- 100% watering, 50% watering, 25% watering and no water (control). Results showed that shoot height of neem seedlings increased after transplanting in the field i.e. from 3 to 6 months of transplantation in different water regimes. After six months of transplantation, the highest shoot height was recorded in 100 % watering regime (45.33 cm) and the lowest was found in control (31.0 cm). Root collar diameter also varied up to different water levels. The highest root collar diameter after six months of transplantation was found in 100% water level (5.67mm) and the lowest was recorded in control. Number of branches, sturdiness ratio and central root length showed similar tread of results. In case of biomass allocation, shoot and root dry biomass of neem seedlings increased in all the treatments compared to control condition. Highest shoot dry biomass was recorded in 50% water level followed by 100 % water level and the lowest was recorded in 25 % level and control watering regimes. Similar result was found in total dry biomass. In case of root dry biomass, shoot to root ratio and quality index varied insignificantly after six months of transplantation. The number of first order lateral roots (FOLRs) recorded insignificantly among the watering treatments after 3, 4 and 6 months but it increased after 4 to 6 months than their earlier number in all the water levels except water stress (control) condition. Though mean diameter of FOLRs increased except control but this diameter varied insignificantly over time. The mean length of FOLRs after 3 months varied insignificantly but it varied after 4 and 6 months. Finally, after six months, the full stressed seedlings showed highest length of FOLR(s) and the 100% watering regime showed lowest length. Increasing the length of FOLRs with the sacrifice of their diameter might be the adaptive mechanism of neem seedlings in water stress condition. Survival rate of neem seedlings was not changed in 100% and 50% watering regimes over time but it decreased sharply in stressed seedlings (20% survival rate) followed by 25% watering regime (95% survival rate) due to water stress condition after 6 months. Considering the overall results, it can be concluded that neem seedlings can be established to combat desertification with ensuring at least 50% additional water supply at their early stages.